Weible

Arry Weible Hurt Cleaning Gun


Weible Robert Colt

Great-Uncle Robert Colt Weible, known in our family as Arry, proudly served his country in the U.S. Navy through three wars — World War II, Korea and Vietnam. An Ohio native, he made his home in Hawaii, where was stationed. He is buried in the “Punchbowl” — National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.

 

Robert Colt Weible: “Didn’t Know Gun was Loaded”

From this week, 65 years ago, as told by the Dover, Ohio Daily Reporter of Jan. 7, 1950:

HURT CLEANING GUN

Robert Weible of 1115 N Wooster-ave was treated by a physician yesterday afternoon for a serious thumb wound received when a gun he was cleaning in his home was accidentally discharged. The bullet from a .45 calibre gun hit his right thumb. The weapon is part of a collection owned by his late father, Robert O. Weible. The injured man said he did not know any of the guns in the collection were loaded.

 

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Josephine Wible, Well-Traveled Teacher


Weible Josephine dhs yearbook 1931

Josephine Wible, daughter of Edwin Frederick and Minnie Mae (Ley) Wible, about 1931, as a popular Dover High School teacher.

Josephine Wible, a Cousin Twice Over

Headlines in the Dover Daily Reporter 60 years ago this August announced, “Josephine Wible Feted.” The occasion? Marriage, at age 48, that September 1954, for one of Dover’s most-beloved and ambitious, teachers.

Rewind a half-century. Josephine, born 1905, was eldest of Edwin Frederick Wible and Minnie Mae (Ley) Wible’s four children.

Edwin, remember, was a son of David Wible, and grandson of Frederick Weible, which made him nephew to my great-great grandfather, Franklin Eli Weible.

Minnie Mae Ley was the only daughter of Augustus Ley and Harriet (Powell) Ley, brother to my great-great grandfather Charles Henry Ley.

Edwin and Minnie’s marriage, in December 1904, was the first union of the Weible and Ley families. My grandparents, Sue Weible, granddaughter of Franklin Eli, and Robert Earl Ley Jr., grandson of Charles Henry Ley, would marry nearly 40 years later.

But back to Josephine. Of her childhood, W.D. Shirk, in his history of the Powell families, writes of a 1917 visit to her parents’ household, “theirs is truly a model family….

“They are … the proud parents of four as bright children as can be found in the Buckeye state; Josephine Elizabeth, b. Sept. 26, 1905; James Frederick, b. Sept. 30, 1908; (Ruth) Eleanor, b. July 21, 1910, and David Augustus, b. Apr. 4, 1916.”

After graduating from Dover High School in 1923, Josephine attended Ohio Wesleyan University, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in 1927. She then spent 13 years racking up classes and specialized training in theater, radio and dramatic production, studying at the University of Pittsburgh, University of Wisconsin and the University of Iowa, which granted her a master’s degree in 1940.

Throughout her studies, Josephine taught. She held a teaching fellowship in the summer theater at Westford, Mass.; taught high school in Dover and Delaware, Ohio and in Rochelle, Illinois; and taught at the post-secondary level at Stevens College (Missouri), Salem College (North Carolina) and Centenary Junior College (Hackettstown, N.J.).

Returning home to Dover was an early stop on her teaching itinerary. Throughout the 1930s, she led the drama and speech groups at Dover High School, and appeared to warm the hearts of everyone, as evidenced in the 1931 yearbook dedication below. The signature, on my grandpa Don Foutz’s junior yearbook, is hers.

Weible Josephine dhs ybook full dedication 1931

Beloved Teacher Summers in Dover

Later editions of the Dover Daily Reporter are only a partial guide to Josephine’s many achievements and their impact on the life of her community. Josephine is featured regularly in “Echoes of Yesteryear”….

The paper always seemed proud of the town’s prodigal daughter for returning to Dover every summer, no matter where her teaching career took her.

It was during a visit home in August 1954 that Josephine was treated to her bridal shower. She likely met John Milliken of Stockton, New Jersey, while teaching at Centenary College. Their marriage — his second, her first — was performed by the Rev. Richard Michel at the Moravian Church.

After marrying, Josephine and John moved to Acton, Mass., where she continued her teaching career and active involvement in the community.

By the time of her death, in May 1974, the Millikens called Los Gatos, Calif., just south of Santa Clara, home. Josephine died one day after my great-grandmother, Beatrice Ethel Weible — her first cousin once removed. John would follow her in death in 1982.

Interestingly, Josephine Wible Milliken chose to be buried at home, near the Weible family plot in Maple Grove Cemetery. John is buried in New Jersey.

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Bill Weible Named Newspaper Promotion Director


Weible Bill TR1973

A 1973 Times-Reporter staff pic of Great Uncle Bill Weible. Following his service in World War II, Bill joined the Dover Daily Reporter in May 1948 and worked at the Times-Reporter for several decades, managing various advertising departments, among other duties.

Times-Reporter Promotes Great Uncle Bill Weible

I was saddened to hear of the passing of Great Aunt Ann Weible on January 21, a day before her 89th birthday. I’m writing this post a day after her burial in Maple Grove Cemetery, back home in Dover, Ohio, and I find myself longing to be there, with extended family, aunts and uncles and my mom’s cousins, whose names I know well, but company I haven’t enjoyed for awhile.

After nearly 14 years apart, I like to think Ann is again with her husband, Great Uncle Bill Weible, who died during a July in 2000 that also saw the passing of my grandma Erma Foutz Miller. Knowing and remembering Uncle Bill, and the stories I’ve been told, I imagine Ann and Bill and Uncle Arry and Grandma and Grandpa Ley are enjoying a blissful — and knowing them, likely entertaining — reunion.

We’re left with our memories until we all see what there is to discover in life’s mysterious, inevitable next chapter.

From 1973, then, a bit of news in the newspaper career of Great Uncle Bill, and a glimpse back then of the Dover, Ohio, Weibles.

Uncle Bill worked at the Dover Daily Reporter for many years after returning from World War II service and college. He was on hand for the merger of the New Philadelphia Times and Dover Daily Reporter in 1968, and retained his post as advertising manager, as reported by the Mansfield News Journal.

Five years later saw Uncle Bill’s ascent to the role of promotion director of the Times-Reporter. From the Dec. 17, 1973 edition:

Three Times-Reporter advertising men have been given new positions….

William Weible, 50, 1515 N. Wooster av., Dover, has been named promotion director.

Weible, who began his newspaper advertising career with the former Daily Reporter in May 1948, will assume his duties Jan. 2 when he returns from sick leave. He suffered a severe heart attack last Sept. 11.

Weible will be responsible for all Times-Reporter and commercial printing department promotion. The Dover native has served in various capacities on the advertising staff and was named display advertising manager when the Daily Reporter and Daily Times merged in 1968.

He and his wife, Ann, have two children, Beth, who graduated last June from Moravian College at Bethlehem, Pa., and Rob, a student at Wittenberg University.

Read the full article by clicking the thumbnail below.

Weible William production manager Times-Reporter 1973

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Beatrice Weible Tries for Board of Elections


Beatrice Weible Dover Woman's Club president

Beatrice Weible in 1959, after her election as president of the Dover Woman’s Club.

Widowed Beatrice Weible Active in Dover Civic Life

Our binge-sharing of several dozen finds combing through Newspapers.com archives continues today with a look at the Weibles.

I don’t seem to be keeping to my grand plan of garnering posts to last well into this year by only sharing one clipping at a time. However, it’s the cumulative effect of seeing our relatives names crop up in the usual places, year after year, that I find most profound.

Take my great-grandmother, Beatrice Morgan Weible. It has always been difficult for me to imagine her young life and family life, since the broadest strokes of history, particularly when it comes to record-keeping, usually focus on the more profound and somber life events: birth, marriage, death.

Like my great-grandparents, Vance Foutz and Laura Zeigler Foutz, great-grandma Weible’s early life was at least in part shaped by birth order and the death of parents.

Vance was born seventh in 1887, 20 years after his oldest brother, Sherman Foutz. His father, Jonathan Foutz, died in 1900 when Vance was just 13. The family would soon move from their home of several generations in Harrison County, with Vance and brother Charles working to support their mother, Rebecca, eventually settling in Dover.

Laura was born tenth in 1885, 18 years after her oldest brother, Johann Heinrich Zeigler. Her father, John Jacob Zeigler, died in 1897 when Laura was not yet 12. While she would have a large support network of siblings surrounding her at their family farm, her married life from the beginning was occupied with sharing a residence and caring for, first, her mother-in-law Rebecca, who died in 1915, and later her own mother, Elizabeth Duerr Zeigler, who died in 1928.

Beatrice Weible, similarly, was born eighth in 1892, 19 years after her oldest brother, William Daniel Morgan. Her father, Thomas W Morgan, emigrated from Wales about 1870, marrying her mother, Jannett Rees, in 1872 in Philadelphia.

From there, the family made their way across Pennsylvania. In 1880, Thomas is working as a heater, probably in a mill or factory, and the family resides in Apollo, Pa. By 1884, the family moves to Carnegie, where Thomas finds iron work in the rolling mill there. He is elected to two terms as councilman, and in February 1895 begins running the Hotel Morgan.

His promising life is cut short at 49 when he dies in October 1897. Great-grandma Beatrice is just 5 years old.

Beatrice Weible 2nd VP woman's club

Beatrice Weible in 1957, after her election as 2nd vice president of the Dover Woman’s Club.

Busy Beatrice in Adopted Hometown Dover

In the years after Thomas Morgan’s death, the Morgan crew travel extensively. Family lore tells of ocean journeys with matriarch Jannett Morgan to their ancestral home in Wales. Fortuitously, they also reside for a couple years in Dover, Ohio, where daughter Jennet May Morgan becomes the bride of Howard Richardson.

It is in Dover where Beatrice meets my great-grandfather, Robert Ohio Weible. Again, their marriage in May 1914 is shaped, at least in part, at least from the vantage point of history, by tragedy: Jannet Morgan dies three months prior to their wedding, in February 1914. R.O.’s parents, Esther Bliss Goddard Weible and Franklin Eli Weible, follow not long after, in January 1915 and February 1917, respectively.

Perhaps losing parents early was more common back then. But I can’t help but wonder how these events shaped my great-grandmother’s early life. Certain pictures, in which her countenance is somber, suggest far more sadness than seeing a life in motion would probably reveal:

Probably I’m reading too much into an expression. Certainly, the photos above, from the 1950s, show an active, proud, pleasant person in the thick of it with the Dover Woman’s Club. That these images capture her in the decade after great-grandfather Robert Ohio Weible’s early death in July 1947 at just 55, reliably demonstrate her resilience, I think.

It is really not until the 1950s that the Dover Daily Reporter becomes positively peppered with at least weekly mentions of Beatrice Weible’s service. As Woman’s Club hostess and later, president. As co-hostess with cohort Edith Harney of weekly Trinity-Bethany Bible classes at Dover First Moravian Church. As frequent hostess of the Moravian Church’s “Merry Marthas.”

And etc. and etc. and etc. (Click on the thumbnails below to read some representative notices. Again, there are hundreds of these published throughout the 1950s and 1960s.)

Weible Beatrice Merry Marthas Daily Reporter 24 Mar 1955 Weible Beatrice Trinity Bethany Moravian Daily Reporter 12 Oct 1964 Woman's Club meeting Beatrice Weible

Sole woman in male BOE field

But one discovery I found particularly intriguing may show evidence of her early re-entry into society life following R.O.’s passing.

From February 1950, the Dover Daily Reporter shares the results of the Tuscarawas County Republican party’s  choice for its board of elections. On the ballot: R.E. Fair, mayor of Shanesville; Forrest Smith of Newcomerstown; J.A. Neff of New Philadelphia; and… one Mrs. Beatrice Weible of Dover.

All were vying for a seat to succeed W. Paul Wilcoxen of Uhrichsville as a member of the county board of elections. The article further described Beatrice Weible as “widow of R.O. Weible,” hopefully a measure of respect for the wife of a man who had served as chairman of the executive committee in the 1930s, as well as president of the Dover Republican Club (among many, many, many other civic groups). But probably a means of further underlining the obvious: here’s a woman running against three men.

Fair was elected on the first ballot by a wide margin, the article reported.

Beatrice Weible tries for county board of elections

However, great-grandma Weible would go on to enmesh herself fully in Dover life, if not politics, throughout her remaining quarter century.

Quite a legacy, I’d say; quite a lady.

Twig 8 Group makes quilts with Beatrice Weible

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Caleb Foutz’s Birthday Buddies | Happy Birthday Week


Fred Foutz 1952

This bouncing baby boy just turned 61. My dad, Fred Foutz, is shown basking after a bath in his first year, 1952. My youngest, Caleb, was due June 5, 2013, but born 6 days earlier.

Family Birthdays – Late May & Early June

Count it among the weirdest ways I’ve been awoken, ever.

This was in our first year in Chicago, which would have been, oh, 12 years ago now. I’m renting one of those cheap apartments attractive to upwardly mobile professionals and the overly desperate.

On the other side of 2 a.m., thuds, shouts. A wayward husband or boyfriend returns from places wayward and otherwise friendly. At least, more friendly than what he walks into: thuds, shouts.

His girl wants to know where he’s been, and why for so long. She lays into him in the kind of keening shrill typical of power drills, audible to an insomniac dog, or sleep-deprived neighbors.

The only words distinct belong to his defense: “But… um… but… see… but it’s my birthday week.”

His birthday week? Gee, now if I’d known that I would have welcomed them into my apartment to stage their battle WWF-style on my living room rug. Or at least had earplugs at the ready.

His birthday week. It’s been an inside joke for my wife and me ever since. And handy in all sorts of situations:

Forget to change the kids’ morning diapers? But… it’s my birthday week.

Fail to pick up the two baskets’ worth of folded laundry at the end of the bed? See… it’s my birthday  week.

For this post, I thought I’d play a little Baby Pool Bingo in reverse, looking at the lineup of birthdays brand new Foutz Caleb could have shared with ancestors past (and present). For these purposes, “birthday week” extends 7 days before and after Caleb Oliver’s actual birth date of May 30, 2013.

Enjoy!

One Week Before Caleb’s Birthday

22 — Birthday of Johann Jacob Zeigler

Great-great grandfather J.J. Zeigler was born in 1827 in Wuertemberg, Germany. He emigrated to America as a young man and married another German immigrant, Elizabeth Duerr. They farmed near Zoar. His died in 1897, when my great-grandmother Laura Zeigler Foutz was a teenager. Foutz family legend claims he was shot and killed; Zeiglers contend — a bit more rationally I think, seeing as there is no newspaper evidence of an unsolved murder — he died of old age.

Harry Heavilin Phoebe Palmer Hannah Palmer Heavilin

This picture from the first decade of the 1900s finds us at the Heavilin farm along Hissem Road in Harrison County, Ohio. Pictured in the front row, from left, are: Harry Heavilin, Colt’s third great-grandmother Phoebe Amanda (Campbell) Palmer and Harry’s wife, Hannah Elizabeth (Palmer) Heavilin. Harry and Hannah’s children are standing behind them.

24 — Birthday of Phoebe Amanda (Campbell) Palmer and Michael Palmer

Family legend has it — I have found nothing to prove it false — that third-great grandparents Phoebe and Michael were born on the same day. She, in 1824 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He, in 1821 in Harrison County, Ohio, where they made their lives farming and raising around nine children, including their oldest, George Silvester Palmer, father to Viola (Palmer) Johnson, born June 1 (see below).

Janet Louise Ley
Janet Louise Ley

25 — Birthday of Janet Louise (Ley) Foutz

Mom! Born in 1952 in Dover, Ohio. Happy 61st!

25 — Birthday of Thomas Moreland

Otherwise known as great-great aunt Ida Foutz’s husband, and cousin Dawn James’s great-great grandfather. Hey, he was born 86 years before my mom in Bowerston, Ohio, old stompin’ grounds of the Foutzes and Morelands.

 

Johnson Delbert Della

26 — Birthday of Delbert and Della Johnson

You’ll find twins on both sides of my family — of both my father’s and mother’s mothers’ branches (Johnson and Weible, respectively) — but always a few generations back, and not in my direct line. But let’s acknowledge the 1904 birth of Delbert and Della. Ain’t they cute? They were siblings of my great-grandfather Charles. Delbert died in 1961; Della (by then a Weber) in 1978.

Olaf Knutson Rekublad

Olaf Knutson Rekublad

28 — Birthday of Olaf Knutson Rekublad

From the Knutson side, one of Caleb Oliver Foutz’s namesakes. Mom Katie’s great-great grandfather was born in 1839 in Telemark, Norway, son of Knudt (get it?) Alfsen Leirbrek and father to Oliver Albert Knutson. Olaf made his home and farm in Northwood, Worth County, Iowa, where the homestead remains in the family to this day.

 

Doris (Foutz) Waddington 1920s

29 — Birthday of Doris Pauline (Foutz) Waddington

Great Aunt Doris was born in May, like two out of three of her older brothers. Only my grandpa Don Foutz was born in March, and he made up for it by having his firstborn in March, who then had a son born in May and a daughter born in March. If circumstantial gymnastics are your thing. Here’s a great pic of her as a kiddo in Dover.

Caleb’s Ancestral Birthday Buddies – May 30

Robert Ohio Weible

30 — Birthday of Robert Ohio Weible

Born in 1892 in what was then Canal Dover, Ohio. If you think being born on Memorial Day is an occasion bedecked in red, white and blue, check out R.O.’s mom — Great-Great Grandma Esther Bliss (Goddard) Weible was born on July 4, 1852. R.O., whom she gave birth to just shy of her 40th, was her youngest child.

Elizabeth Duerr Zeigler 1903

Great-great Grandmother Elizabeth (Duerr) Zeigler, 1903

30 — Birthday of Elizabeth (Duerr) Zeigler

My great-great grandparents Zeigler shared a birth month, though Elizabeth was some 18 years’ J.J. Zeigler’s junior. She was born in 1845, also in Baden-Wurttemberg, which is where her mother, Katharina Weinnman was born May 17, 1814.

Post-Birthday Buddies

Ley Charles Augustus Karl Lester

Clockwise, from top left: Charles Henry Ley, his father Augustus, his grandfather Karl Gottleib Ley, his son Lester Herman Ley. About a year before Karl’s death. From Doris Ley Hill’s book, THE CARL FREDERICK LEY FAMILY.

1 –  Birthday of Charles Henry Ley

Born 1866 in Bakersville, Ohio, 110 years and 1 day before great-great grandson Colt Foutz. He followed father Augustus into the dry goods business, eventually traveling the country as a salesman for a Pittsburgh-based wholesale dry goods firm. After serving as city councilman and board of education member, he was elected to two straight terms as Tuscarawas County treasurer. He retired to private life in New Philadelphia, Ohio, where he lived until his death in November, 1925.

 

Colt Foutz Birthday June 2, 1976

Grandparents Bob and Sue Ley were on hand to welcome me into the world, June 2, 1976, at Riverside Hospital in Columbus. Way to go, Mom!

2 — Birthday of Frederick Colt Foutz

Bicentennial baby. Born in Columbus, Ohio to Frederick Charles Foutz and Janet Louise Ley.

3 — Birthday of Rachel (Foutz) Coleman

Second great aunt. Born 105 years before Colt, in 1871, to great-great grandparents Jonathan and Rebecca (Caldwell) Foutz. We still don’t know what became of Rachel. A daughter, Blanche Escott, appears to have lived into her late 90s in Kent, Ohio. Maybe there are descendants out there — hint, hint — who can help shed light on Aunt Rachel’s life and too-early death.

Viola Mae (Palmer) Johnson

Viola Mae (Palmer) Johnson

3 — Birthday of Viola Mae (Palmer) Johnson

Great grandmother, in 1889, to George and Amanda Jane (Cummings) Palmer. She was youngest of 10. The family farmed up the road a piece from the historic Foutz homestead in Harrison County. Though she would marry a Johnson, Charles, whose New Philadelphia family had come there from Guernsey County to mine coal.

5 — Birthday of Frederick Charles Foutz

Dad! Born several weeks’ premature in 1952 to Donald Dale and Erma Maxine (Johnson) Foutz.  He was their youngest, and was born 11 days after my Mom in the same Dover, Ohio hospital. Birthday week, indeed.

Categories: Foutz, Johnson, Knutson, Ley, Milestones, Weible | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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